Maggie O’Farrel won this year’s Women’s Prize for Fiction for her book about Shakespeare’s son, Ken Follett adds another tale that precedes the Pillars of the Earth, and former Miami Vanessa Lillie provides another spine-tingling thriller which highlights only three of the great reads on this week’s cart.

Apeirogon by Colum McCann
Bassam is Palestinian and Rami is Israeli, but when their world of intractable conflict results in the death of each of their daughters, their loss connects them and they become part of a much larger tale that ranges over centuries and continents.

The Evening and Morning by Ken Follett
In 997 CE, the turbulent end of the Dark Ages, three characters find their lives intertwined in a prequel to The Pillars of the Earth.

For the Best by Vanessa Lillie
After struggling for years to build the perfect family and career, Jules Worthington-Smith is dangerously close to losing everything when her wallet is found next to a dead man and she becomes the prime suspect in his murder.

Hamnet by Maggie O’Farrell
A luminous portrait of a marriage, a shattering evocation of a family ravaged by grief and loss, and a tender and unforgettable re-imagining of a boy whose life has been all but forgotten, and whose name was given to one of his father’s most celebrated plays.

The Harbinger II: The Return by Jonathan Cahn
When Nouriel, Ana Goren, and the Prophet return, they come with mysteries to be unlocked through the giving of ancient seals, and they also bring dreams and a little girl as mysterious as the prophet. 

How to Lead: Wisdom from the World’s Greatest CEOs, Founders, and Game Changers by David Rubenstein
Learn the principles and guiding philosophies of Bill Gates, Jeff Bezos, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Warren Buffett, Oprah Winfrey, and many others through illuminating conversations about their remarkable lives and careers.

Killing Crazy Horse: The Merciless Indian Wars in America by Bill O’Reilly
A gripping journey through the American West and the historic clashes between Native Americans and settlers.

The Paris Secret by Natasha Lester
A historical novel about a secret collection of Dior gowns that ties back to the first female pilots of WWII and a heartbreaking story of love and sacrifice.

Piranesi by Susanna Clarke
Piranesi’s house which he lives to explore is an astonishing new world, an infinite labyrinth, full of startling images and surreal beauty, haunted by the tides and the clouds.

Star Wars: Thrawn Ascendancy: Chaos Rising by Timothy Zahn
As Thrawn’s first command probes deeper into the vast stretch of space his people call the Chaos, he realizes that the mission he has been given is not what it seems. 

Storey’s Curious Compendium of Practical and Obscure Skills
by How-To Experts at Storey Publishing
Anyone curious about the myriad ways people have taught themselves to make, grow, and build things will find everything they’ve ever wondered about in this colorful, inviting volume. 

Transcendent Kingdom by Yaa Gyasi
A deeply moving portrait of a family of Ghanaian immigrants ravaged by depression and addiction and grief–a novel about faith, science, religion, love.

To Sleep in a Sea of Stars by Christopher Paolini
During a routine survey mission on an uncolonized planet, Kira’s elation at finding an alien relic turns to terror when the ancient dust around her begins to move.

Total Power by Vince Flynn
It’s a race against the clock when ISIS takes out the entire US power grid and throws the country into chaos.

Many of the books on this week’s cart are written by well-known authors or authors you should get to know. There are some suspense thrillers with or without vampires, some family books about choices taken or not taken, historical fiction and history that is true. Read more about each of them below.

All the Devils are Here by Louise Penny
Chief Inspector Armand Gamache of the Sûreté du Quebec investigates a sinister plot involving his godfather and a dark secret in the City of Lights.

Chaos by Iris Johansen
When CIA agent Alisa Flynn flaunts the rules by breaking into a mansion in the middle of the night, she is caught by the owner billionaire Gabe Korgan, and she has only a spit second to try to convince him to join her on the most important mission of her life.

Cynical Theories: How Activist Scholarship Made Everything About Race, Gender and Identity—And Why This Harms Everybody by Helen Pluckrose
While acknowledging the need to challenge the complacency of those who think a just society has been fully achieved, Pluckrose breaks down how often-radical activist scholarship does far more harm than good, not least to those marginalized communities it claims to champion. 

Dark Song by Christine Feehan
Before he found Elisabeta, Ferro Arany was an ancient warrior without emotion, but he knows it will take more than kind words and soft touches to convince the fractured woman that they are partners, not master and prisoner.

Dear Ann by Bobbie Ann Mason
A woman looks back on her life, her first love and the choices she made in a tale of grief, regret and memory, wrapped in a compelling story of first love.

The Discomfort of Evening by Marieke Lucas Rijneveld
A best seller in the Netherlands, this book offers readers a rare vision of rural and religious life in the Netherlands that asks: In the absence of comfort and care, what can the mind of a child invent to protect itself? 

The Exiles by Christina Baker Kline
An emotionally resonant, historical novel that captures the hardship, oppression, opportunity and hope of a trio of women’s lives—two English convicts and an orphaned Aboriginal girl — in nineteenth-century Australia.

His Truth is Marching On: John Lewis and the Power of Hope
by Jon Meacham
An intimate and revealing portrait of civil rights icon and longtime U.S. congressman John Lewis, linking his life to the painful quest for justice in America from the 1950s to the present–from the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Soul of America.

How to Educate a Citizen: The Power of Shared Knowledge to Unify a Nation by E. D. Hirsch
A clear and well-grounded argument for why a knowledge-centric education is critical for enhancing educational equity. 

The Lying Life of Adults by Elena Ferrante
An up-close portrait of a woman reflecting back on the mysterious years of her adolescence, the transition from child to adult, from youthful ignorance to a deeper, more complicated understanding about her city, those around her, and ultimately, herself

Monogamy by Sue Miller
Derailed by the sudden passing of her husband of thirty years, an artist on the brink of a gallery opening struggles to pick up the pieces of her life before discovering harrowing evidence of her husband’s affair.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac 2021 by Old Farmers Almanac
A best-selling annual, the handy yellow book fulfills every need and expectation as a calendar of the heavens, a time capsule of the year, an essential reference that reads like a magazine.

One by One by Ruth Ware
A trendy London-based tech startup, organizes a weeklong trip for the team in the French Alps, but as tensions between coworkers mount a storm is also brewing outside causing an avalanche that leaves them cut off from all access.

A Question of Betrayal: An Elena Standish Novel by Anne Perry
As Elena gets word of a secret group working to put Austria in the hands of Germany, her older sister, Margot, is in Berlin to watch a childhood friend get married–to a member of the Gestapo.

Red Pill by Hari Kunzru
An author receives a prestigious writing fellowship in Germany, but he soon finds himself searching for order in a world that frames madness as truth.

Robert B. Parker’s Fool’s Paradise by Mike Lupica
When a body is discovered at the lake in Paradise, Police Chief Jesse Stone is surprised to find he recognizes the murder victim–the man had been at the same AA meeting as Jesse the evening before.

Shadows in Death by J. D. Robb
When a night out at the theatre is interrupted by the murder of a young woman in Washington Square Park, it seems like an ordinary case for Detective Eve Dallas, but when Roarke spots a shadow from his past in the crowd, Eve realizes that this case is far from business as usual.

Something Worth Doing by Jane Kirkpatrick
Pioneer Abigail Scott denies herself the joys of a simpler life to achieve her dream of securing rights for women, but running a controversial newspaper and leading suffrage efforts in the Northwest carry a great personal cost.

The Stone Wall by Beverly Lewis
Eager to begin a new chapter as a Lancaster County tour guide, Anna searches for the answers of her grandmother’s past–a mystery due to the elderly woman’s Alzheimer’s, but Anna is also faced with a difficult choice between a Mennonite man and an Amish widower.

What Are You Going Through by Sigrid Nunez
A woman describes a series of encounters she has with various people in the ordinary course of her life, all with the common need to talk about themselves and to have an audience to their experiences, but when one of them makes an extraordinary request she finds herself drawn into an intense and transformative experience of her own.

Shelf of books

From a literary cabinet of curiosities about the natural world to the pulse-pounding thrills about two different women whose paths intersect as they try to escape their fates, this is a shelf of new books that you don’t want to miss! We are open for business, but we also still do curbside if you prefer.

Blacktop Wasteland by S. A. Cosby
A searing, operatic story of a man pushed to his limits by poverty, race, and his own former life of crime.

Crooked Hallelujah by Kelli Jo Ford
Crooked Hallelujah tells the stories of Justine–a mixed-blood Cherokee woman– and her daughter, Reney, as they move from Eastern Oklahoma’s Indian Country in the hopes of starting a new, more stable life in Texas amid the oil bust of the 1980s. 

Every Kind of Wicked by Lisa Black
Forensics expert Maggie Gardiner is swept up in a dangerous web of lies when detective Jack Renner’s investigation into a university student’s death violently converges with a suspicious overdose case being overseen by Maggie’s homicide detective ex.

Finding Freedom: Harry and Meghan and the Making of a Modern Royal Family  by Omid Scobie
Up-close and disarming portrait of a confident, influential and forward-thinking couple who are unafraid to break with tradition, determined to create a new path away from the spotlight, and dedicated to building a humanitarian legacy that will make a profound difference in the world.

The Last Flight by Julie Clark
Two women meet in an airport, both alone, both scared, and both urgently needing an escape from their lives, but after exchanging tickets there is a plane crash and it becomes clear that one of them wasn’t telling the truth.

The Last Great Road Bum by Hector Tobar
A novel based on the peripatetic true story of a naive son of Urbana, Illinois, who died fighting with guerrillas in El Salvador.

The Memory of Souls by Jenn Lyons
Trying to convince the king of the Vanae to forfeit his people’s immortality to save humanity, Kihrin discovers that his growing connection to Vol Karoth is posing an even greater threat in this sequel to The Name of All Things.

Royal by Danielle Steel
When a tragic turn of events leaves an infant orphaned, the child is raised in humble circumstances by a stable manager and his wife and no one, not even she, knows of her lineage. 

Separated: Inside an American Tragedy by Jacob Soboroff
Soboroff zooms in on the White House’s decision to separate children from their parents as a deterrent to border crossers and how, in the face of congressional inaction, a cadre of presidential advisers can introduce policies with shocking, unintended consequences.

Someone to Romance by Mary Balogh
Once she’s twenty-five, Lady Jessica Archer decides it’s time to wed though she no longer believes she will find true love.

Squeeze Me by Carl Hiaasen
Angie Armstrong, wildlife wrangler extraordinaire, is summoned to a posh island to deal with a mysterious and impolite influx of huge, hungry pythons.

Superman’s Not Coming: Our National Water Crisis and What We the People Can do about It by Erin Brockovich
From the environmental activist, consumer advocate, renowned crusader, and champion fighter whose courageous case against Pacific Gas and Electric was dramatized in the Oscar-winning film comes a book to inspire change that looks at our present situation with water and reveals the imminent threats to our most precious, essential element as it shows us how, in large and practical ways, we can each take action to make changes in our cities, our towns, and our villages before it is too late.

Thick as Thieves by Sandra Brown
Arden Maxwell, a daughter of the man who disappeared twenty years ago after a heist, has never reconciled with her father’s abandonment of her and her sister, but when she returns to her hometown to get answers his two co-conspirators are watching her every move.

Vesper Flights by Helen MacDonald
Helen Macdonald brings together a collection of her best loved essays, along with new pieces on topics ranging from nostalgia for a vanishing countryside to the tribulations of farming ostriches to her own private vespers while trying to fall asleep.

Whirlwind by Janet Daily
Everyone’s talking about Whirlwind at this year’s Professional Bull Rider’s Competition, but the promising young bull is the last thing on Shane Tully’s mind once he lays eyes on the lady responsible for bringing Whirlwind to the arena. 

You Lucky Dog by Julia London
An accidental dog swap unleashes an unexpected love match in this new romantic comedy celebrating the special bond between humans and dogs. 

1. Orange for the Sunsets by Tina Athaide

Asha and her best friend, Yesofu, never cared about the differences between them: Indian. African. Girl. Boy. Short. Tall. But when Idi Amin announces that Indians have ninety days to leave the country, suddenly those differences are the only things that people in Entebbe can see—not the shared after-school samosas or Asha cheering for Yesofu at every cricket game. Determined for her life to stay the same, Asha clings to her world tighter than ever before. But Yesofu is torn, pulled between his friends, his family, and a promise of a better future. Now as neighbors leave and soldiers line the streets, the two friends find that nothing seems sure—not even their friendship.

2. This Promise of Change: One Girl’s Story in the Fight for School Equality by Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy

In 1956, one year before federal troops escorted the Little Rock 9 into Central High School, fourteen year old Jo Ann Allen was one of twelve African-American students who broke the color barrier and integrated Clinton High School in Tennessee. At first things went smoothly for the Clinton 12, but then outside agitators interfered, pitting the townspeople against one another. Uneasiness turned into anger, and even the Clinton Twelve themselves wondered if the easier thing to do would be to go back to their old school. Jo Ann–clear-eyed, practical, tolerant, and popular among both black and white students—found herself called on as the spokesperson of the group. But what about just being a regular teen? This is the heartbreaking and relatable story of her four months thrust into the national spotlight and as a trailblazer in history. Based on original research and interviews and featuring backmatter with archival materials and notes from the authors on the co-writing process.

3. New Kid by Jerry Craft

Seventh grader Jordan Banks loves nothing more than drawing cartoons about his life. But instead of sending him to the art school of his dreams, his parents enroll him in a prestigious private school known for its academics, where Jordan is one of the few kids of color in his entire grade. As he makes the daily trip from his Washington Heights apartment to the upscale Riverdale Academy Day School, Jordan soon finds himself torn between two worlds—and not really fitting into either one. Can Jordan learn to navigate his new school culture while keeping his neighborhood friends and staying true to himself?

4. Stepsister by Jennifer Donnelly

Isabelle should be blissfully happy – she’s about to win the handsome prince. Except Isabelle isn’t the beautiful girl who lost the glass slipper and captured the prince’s heart. She’s the ugly stepsister who’s cut off her toes to fit into Cinderella’s shoe . . . which is now filling with her blood.
When the prince discovers Isabelle’s deception, she’s turned away in shame. It’s no more than she deserves: she’s a plain girl in a world that values beauty; a bold girl in a world that wants her to be pliant.

5. Never Caught: The Story of Ona Judge, George and Martha Washington’s Courageous Slave Who Dared to Run Away by Erica Armstrong Dunbar and Kathleen Van Cleve

In this incredible narrative, Erica Armstrong Dunbar reveals a fascinating and heartbreaking behind-the-scenes look at the Washingtons when they were the First Family—and an in-depth look at their slave, Ona Judge, who dared to escape from one of the nation’s Founding Fathers.
Born into a life of slavery, Ona Judge eventually grew up to be George and Martha Washington’s “favored” dower slave. When she was told that she was going to be given as a wedding gift to Martha Washington’s granddaughter, Ona made the bold and brave decision to flee to the north, where she would be a fugitive.

6. Focused by Alyson Gerber

Clea can’t control her thoughts. She knows she has to do her homework . . . but she gets distracted. She knows she can’t just say whatever thought comes into her head . . . but sometimes she can’t help herself. She know she needs to focus . . . but how can she do that when the people around her are always chewing gum loudly or making other annoying noises?
It’s starting to be a problem–not just in school, but when Clea’s playing chess or just hanging out with her best friend. Other kids are starting to notice. When Clea fails one too many tests, her parents take her to be tested, and she finds out that she has ADHD, which means her attention is all over the place instead of where it needs to be.

7. Allies by Alan Gratz

Welcome to D-Day. Dee, a young U.S. soldier, is on a boat racing toward the French coast. And Dee — along with his brothers-in-arms — is terrified. He feels the weight of World War II on his shoulders.
But Dee is not alone. Behind enemy lines in France, a girl named Samira works as a spy, trying to sabotage the German army. Meanwhile, paratrooper James leaps from his plane to join a daring midnight raid. And in the thick of battle, Henry, a medic, searches for lives to save.

8. Reaching for the Moon: The Autobiography of NASA Mathematician Katherine Johnson by Katherine Johnson

As a young girl, Katherine Johnson showed an exceptional aptitude for math. In school she quickly skipped ahead several grades and was soon studying complex equations with the support of a professor who saw great promise in her. But ability and opportunity did not always go hand in hand. As an African American and a girl growing up in an era of brutal racism and sexism, Katherine faced daily challenges. Still, she lived her life with her father’s words in mind: “You are no better than anyone else, and nobody else is better than you.” In the early 1950s, Katherine was thrilled to join the organization that would become NASA. She worked on many of NASA’s biggest projects including the Apollo 11 mission that landed the first men on the moon.

9. It’s the End of the World as I Know it by Matthew Landis

Ever since his mother was killed in the line of duty in Iraq, Derrick has been absolutely certain that the apocalypse is coming. And he’s prepared: he’s got plenty of canned goods, he’s fully outfitted with HAZMAT suits, and he’s building himself a sturdy fallout shelter. When his neighbor Misty insists on helping with the shelter, Derrick doesn’t think it’s such a good idea. Misty’s just had a kidney transplant, and her reaction to her brush with death is the opposite of Derrick’s: where Derrick wants to hide, Misty wants to see and do everything. But as confident as Misty is, Derrick’s doomsday fears just keep getting worse. And Derrick’s promised apocalypse day begins with a very strange disaster, Derrick and Misty have to figure out a way to survive–especially when the end of the world as they know it looks nothing like they expected.

10. A Good Kind of Trouble by Lisa Moore Ramee

Twelve-year-old Shayla is allergic to trouble. All she wants to do is to follow the rules. (Oh, and she’d also like to make it through seventh grade with her best friendships intact, learn to run track, and have a cute boy see past her giant forehead.) But in junior high, it’s like all the rules have changed. Now she’s suddenly questioning who her best friends are and some people at school are saying she’s not black enough. Wait, what?Shay’s sister, Hana, is involved in Black Lives Matter, but Shay doesn’t think that’s for her. After experiencing a powerful protest, though, Shay decides some rules are worth breaking. She starts wearing an armband to school in support of the Black Lives movement. Soon everyone is taking sides. And she is given an ultimatum.

11. Pay Attention Carter Jones by Gary D. Schmidt

Carter Jones is astonished early one morning when he finds a real English butler, bowler hat and all, on the doorstep – one who stays to help the Jones family, which is a little bit broken.
In addition to figuring out middle school, Carter has to adjust to the unwelcome presence of this new know-it-all adult in his life and navigate the butler’s notions of decorum. And ultimately, when his burden of grief and anger from the past can no longer be ignored, Carter learns that a burden becomes lighter when it is shared.

12. Our Castle by the Sea by Lucy Strange

Growing up in a lighthouse, 11-year-old Pet’s world has been one of storms, secret tunnels, and stories about sea monsters. But now the country is at war and the clifftops are a terrifying battleground. Pet will need to muster all her bravery to uncover why her family is being torn apart.

13. A Time Traveler’s Theory of Relativity by Nicole Valentine

Twelve-year-old Finn is used to people in his family disappearing. His twin sister, Faith, drowned when they were three years old. A few months ago, his mom abandoned him and his dad with no explanation. Finn clings to the concrete facts in his physics books―and to his best friend, Gabi―to ward off his sadness. But then his grandmother tells him a secret: the women in their family are Travelers, able to move back and forth in time. Finn’s mom is trapped somewhere in the timeline, and she’s left Finn a portal to find her. But to succeed, he’ll have to put his trust in something bigger than logic.

14. Other Words for Home by Jasmine Warga

Jude never thought she’d be leaving her beloved older brother and father behind, all the way across the ocean in Syria. But when things in her hometown start becoming volatile, Jude and her mother are sent to live in Cincinnati with relatives. At first, everything in America seems too fast and too loud. The American movies that Jude has always loved haven’t quite prepared her for starting school in the US—and her new label of “Middle Eastern,” an identity she’s never known before. But this life also brings unexpected surprises—there are new friends, a whole new family, and a school musical that Jude might just try out for. Maybe America, too, is a place where Jude can be seen as she really is.

15.  Genesis Begins Again by Alicia D. Williams

There are ninety-six things Genesis hates about herself. She knows the exact number because she keeps a list. Like #95: Because her skin is so dark, people call her charcoal and eggplant—even her own family. And #61: Because her family is always being put out of their house, belongings laid out on the sidewalk for the world to see. When your dad is a gambling addict and loses the rent money every month, eviction is a regular occurrence. What’s not so regular is that this time they all don’t have a place to crash, so Genesis and her mom have to stay with her grandma. It’s not that Genesis doesn’t like her grandma, but she and Mom always fight—Grandma haranguing Mom to leave Dad, that she should have gone back to school, that if she’d married a lighter skinned man none of this would be happening, and on and on and on. But things aren’t all bad. Genesis actually likes her new school; she’s made a couple friends, her choir teacher says she has real talent, and she even encourages Genesis to join the talent show.

1. With The Fire on High by Elizabeth Acevedo

Ever since she got pregnant freshman year, Emoni Santiago’s life has been about making the tough decisions—doing what has to be done for her daughter and her abuela. The one place she can let all that go is in the kitchen, where she adds a little something magical to everything she cooks, turning her food into straight-up goodness. Even though she dreams of working as a chef after she graduates, Emoni knows that it’s not worth her time to pursue the impossible. Yet despite the rules she thinks she has to play by, once Emoni starts cooking, her only choice is to let her talent break free.

2. The Lady Rogue by Jenn Bennett

Traveling with her treasure-hunting father has always been a dream for Theodora. She’s read every book in his library, has an impressive knowledge of the world’s most sought-after relics, and has all the ambition in the world. What she doesn’t have is her father’s permission. That honor goes to her father’s nineteen-year-old protégé—and once-upon-a-time love of Theodora’s life—Huck Gallagher, while Theodora is left to sit alone in her hotel in Istanbul. Until Huck returns from an expedition without her father and enlists Theodora’s help in rescuing him. Armed with her father’s travel journal, the reluctant duo learns that her father had been digging up information on a legendary and magical ring that once belonged to Vlad the Impaler—more widely known as Dracula—and that it just might be the key to finding him.

3. Last Bus to Everland by Sophie Cameron

Brody Fair feels like nobody gets him: not his overworked parents, not his genius older brother, and definitely not the girls in the projects set on making his life miserable. Then he meets Nico, an art student who takes Brody to Everland, a “knock-off Narnia” that opens at 11:21pm each Thursday for Nico and his band of present-day misfits and miscreants. Here Brody finds his tribe and a weekly respite from a world where he feels out of place. But when the doors to Everland begin to disappear, Brody is forced to make a decision: He can say goodbye to Everland and to Nico, or stay there and risk never seeing his family again.

4. Superman: Dawnbreaker by Matt de la Peña

Clark Kent has always been faster, stronger–better–than everyone around him. But it’s not like he’s earned his powers . . . yet. Lately it’s difficult to hold back and keep his heroics in the shadows. When Clark follows the sound of a girl crying, he comes across Gloria Alvarez and learns that people are disappearing from the Mexican-American and undocumented worker community in Smallville. Teaming up with his best friend, Lana Lang, Clark discovers that before he can save the world, he must save Smallville.

5. Sorry for Your Loss by Jessie Ann Foley

As the youngest of eight, painfully average Pup Flanagan is used to flying under the radar. He’s barely passing his classes. He lets his longtime crush walk all over him. And he’s in no hurry to decide on a college path. The only person who ever made him think he could be more was his older brother Patrick. But that was before Patrick died suddenly, leaving Pup with a family who won’t talk about it and acquaintances who just keep saying, “sorry for your loss.” When Pup excels at a photography assignment he thought he’d bomb, things start to come into focus. His dream girl shows her true colors. An unexpected friend exposes Pup to a whole new world, right under his nose. And the photograph that was supposed to show Pup a way out of his grief ultimately reveals someone else who is still stuck in their own. Someone with a secret regret Pup never could have imagined.

6. The How and the Why by Cynthia Hand

Cassandra McMurtrey has the best parents a girl could ask for; they’ve given Cass a life she wouldn’t trade for the world. She has everything she needs—but she has questions, too. Like, to know who she is. Where she came from. Questions her adoptive parents can’t answer, no matter how much they love her. But eighteen years ago, someone wrote Cass a series of letters. And they may just hold the answers Cass has been searching for. Alternating between Cass’s search for answers and letters from the pregnant teen who placed her for adoption, this emotionally resonant narrative is the perfect read for fans of Nina LaCour and Jandy Nelson.

7. Spin by Lamar Giles

When rising star Paris Secord (aka DJ ParSec) is found dead on her turntables, it sends the local music scene reeling. No one is feeling that grief more than her shunned pre-fame best friend, Kya, and ParSec’s chief groupie, Fuse — two sworn enemies who happened to be the ones who discovered her body.

8. Refraction by Naomi Hughes

Marty Callahan still remembers the earth before the fog, before all the mirrors turned deadly. Everything changed one year ago when an alien ship was destroyed over earth. No one knows why the shattered ship covered the world in fog, or how it turned mirrors into portals for vicious monsters. All Marty knows is that his small coastal town is one of the few remaining safe havens. Though all reflective surfaces are now illegal to protect what’s left of the population, mirrors still have unique uses and the demand continues to rise. Seizing the opportunity, Marty becomes a distributor in an illegal mirror trade until he’s caught by the mayor’s son, whose slate is far from clean. The punishment for their crimes is exile, and both of them are sent to one of the many abandoned and dangerous cities overrun by fog.

9. A Curse so Dark and Lonely by Brigid Kemmerer

It once seemed so easy to Prince Rhen, the heir to Emberfall. Cursed by a powerful enchantress to repeat the autumn of his eighteenth year over and over, he knew he could be saved if a girl fell for him. But that was before he learned that at the end of each autumn, he would turn into a vicious beast hell-bent on destruction. That was before he destroyed his castle, his family, and every last shred of hope.
Nothing has ever been easy for Harper. With her father long gone, her mother dying, and her brother barely holding their family together while constantly underestimating her because of her cerebral palsy, she learned to be tough enough to survive. But when she tries to save someone else on the streets of Washington, DC, she’s instead somehow sucked into Rhen’s cursed world.

10. Catfishing on CatNet by Naomi Kritzer

Because her mom is always on the move, Steph hasn’t lived anyplace longer than six months. Her only constant is an online community called CatNet—a social media site where users upload cat pictures—a place she knows she is welcome. What Steph doesn’t know is that the admin of the site, CheshireCat, is a sentient A.I. When a threat from Steph’s past catches up to her and ChesireCat’s existence is discovered by outsiders, it’s up to Steph and her friends, both online and IRL, to save her.

11. Warrior of the Wild by Tricia Levenseller

As her father’s chosen heir, eighteen-year-old Rasmira has trained her whole life to become a warrior and lead her village. But when her coming-of-age trial is sabotaged and she fails the test, her father banishes her to the monster-filled wilderness with an impossible quest: To win back her honor, she must kill the oppressive god who claims tribute from the villages each year or die trying.

12. Patron Saints of Nothing by Randy Ribay

Jay Reguero plans to spend the last semester of his senior year playing video games before heading to the University of Michigan in the fall. But when he discovers that his Filipino cousin Jun was murdered as part of President Duterte’s war on drugs, and no one in the family wants to talk about what happened, Jay travels to the Philippines to find out the real story. Hoping to uncover more about Jun and the events that led to his death, Jay is forced to reckon with the many sides of his cousin before he can face the whole horrible truth — and the part he played in it.

13. Birthday by Meredith Russo

ERIC: There was the day we were born. There was the minute Morgan and I decided we were best friends for life. The years where we stuck by each other’s side―as Morgan’s mom died, as he moved across town, as I joined the football team, as my parents started fighting. But sometimes I worry that Morgan and I won’t be best friends forever. That there’ll be a day, a minute, a second, where it all falls apart and there’s no turning back the clock.
MORGAN: I know that every birthday should feel like a new beginning, but I’m trapped in this mixed-up body, in this wrong life, in Nowheresville, Tennessee, on repeat. With a dad who cares about his football team more than me, a mom I miss more than anything, and a best friend who can never know my biggest secret. Maybe one day I’ll be ready to become the person I am inside. To become her. To tell the world. To tell Eric. But when?
Six years of birthdays reveal Eric and Morgan’s destiny as they come together, drift apart, fall in love, and discover who they’re meant to be―and if they’re meant to be together. From the award-winning author of If I Was Your Girl, Meredith Russo, comes a heart-wrenching and universal story of identity, first love, and fate.

14. Call Down the Hawk by Maggie Stiefvater

Ronan Lynch is a dreamer. He can pull both curiosities and catastrophes out of his dreams and into his compromised reality.
Jordan Hennessy is a thief. The closer she comes to the dream object she is after, the more inextricably she becomes tied to it.
Carmen Farooq-Lane is a hunter. Her brother was a dreamer . . . and a killer. She has seen what dreaming can do to a person. And she has seen the damage that dreamers can do. But that is nothing compared to the destruction that is about to be unleashed.

15. On the Come Up by Angie Thomas

Sixteen-year-old Bri wants to be one of the greatest rappers of all time. Or at least win her first battle. As the daughter of an underground hip hop legend who died right before he hit big, Bri’s got massive shoes to fill. But it’s hard to get your come up when you’re labeled a hoodlum at school, and your fridge at home is empty after your mom loses her job. So Bri pours her anger and frustration into her first song, which goes viral . . . for all the wrong reasons. Bri soon finds herself at the center of a controversy, portrayed by the media as more menace than MC. But with an eviction notice staring her family down, Bri doesn’t just want to make it—she has to. Even if it means becoming the very thing the public has made her out to be.  

Lety Out Loud: Cervantes, Angela: 9781338159349: Amazon.com: Books

Lety Out Loud by Angela Cervantes

Lety Muñoz’s first language is Spanish, and she likes to take her time putting her words together. She loves volunteering at the animal shelter because the dogs and cats there don’t care if she can’t always find the right words. When the shelter needs a volunteer to write animal profiles, Lety jumps at the chance. Classmate Hunter also wants to write profiles-so he devises a competition and whoever gets their animals adopted the fastest wins.

One Third Nerd by Gennifer Choldenko

Fifth grade is not for amateurs, according to Liam. Luckily, he knows that being more than one-third nerd is not cool. Liam lives in the Bay area near San Francisco with his mom and two younger sisters. Dakota is fascinated by science and has a big personality but struggles to make friends; Izzy, a child with Down syndrome, makes friends easily and notices things that go past everyone else. Dad lives across town, but he’s over a lot.

The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise by Dan Gemeinhart

Coyote has not been home for five years…since her mother and two sisters were killed in a car crash. But when she learns that the park in her old neighborhood is being demolished―the very same park where she, her mom, and her sisters buried a treasured memory box―she devises an elaborate plan to get her dad to drive 3,600 miles back to Washington state in four days…without him realizing it.
Along the way, they’ll pick up a strange crew of misfit travelers. Lester has a lady loveSalvador and his mom are looking to start over. Val needs a safe place to be herself. And then there’s Gladys…

Song for a Whale: Kelly, Lynne: 9781524770235: Amazon.com: Books

Song for a Whale by Lynne Kelly

From fixing the class computer to repairing old radios, twelve-year-old Iris is a tech genius. But she’s the only deaf person in her school, so people often treat her like she’s not very smart. If you’ve ever felt like no one was listening to you, then you know how hard that can be.
When she learns about Blue 55, a real whale who is unable to speak to other whales, Iris understands how he must feel. Then she has an idea: she should invent a way to “sing” to him! But he’s three thousand miles away. How will she play her song for him?

Because of the Rabbit by Cynthia Lord

On the last night of summer, Emma tags along with her game warden father on a routine call. They’re supposed to rescue a wild rabbit from a picket fence, but instead, they find a little bunny. Emma convinces her father to bring him home for the night. The next day is the first day of school
and Emma wants to make a best friend in school. But things don’t go as planned and she’s paired with a boy named Jack for a project. He can’t stay on topic, he speaks out of turn, and he’s obsessed with animals. Jack doesn’t fit in, and Emma’s worried he’ll make her stand out.

Rescuing Rialto: A Baby Sea Otter’s Story by Lynda V. Mapes

On a sunny August morning in 2016, a baby sea otter was found washed up on the sand. Orphaned and sick, Rialto was taken to the Seattle Aquarium, where his dedicated caretakers nursed him back to health and taught him how to be an otter.

Meena Meets Her Match by Karla Manternach

Meena’s life is full of color. She wears vibrant clothes, eats every shade of the rainbow, and plucks eye-catching trash from the neighborhood recycling bins. But when Meena’s best friend, Sofía, stops playing with her at recess and she experiences an unexpected and scary incident at breakfast, nothing can fight off the gray. That’s when Meena comes up with a plan to create the BEST and most COLORFUL Valentine’s Day Box in the class. With the help of her cousin, Eli, and her stuffed zebra, Raymond, Meena discovers that the best way to break through the blah is to let her true colors shine.

Saving Fable by Scott Reintgen

Indira has been a character-in-waiting her entire life. So she can’t believe her luck when she’s finally chosen to travel to Fable and study at the renowned Protagonist Preparatory, a school known for producing the best heroes. As the danger spreads, Indira discovers all of Fable is under siege. With her friends Maxi and Phoenix by her side, she pieces together clues that will reveal who is behind the dark magic threatening them all. But the more Indira uncovers, the more doubt she feels about her place in this world of stories. After all, can a side character really save the day?

The Oddmire Book One: Changeling by William Ritter

Magic is fading from the Wild Wood. To renew it, goblins must perform an ancient ritual involving the rarest of their kind—a newborn changeling. But when the night arrives to trade a human baby for a goblin one, something goes terribly wrong. After laying the changeling in a human infant’s crib, the goblin Kull is briefly distracted. By the time he turns back, the changeling has already perfectly mimicked the human child. Too perfectly: Kull cannot tell them apart, so he leaves both babies behind.

Birdie by Eileen Spinelli

A relatable novel-in-verse about loss… and what happens afterwards

Twelve-year-old Birdie Briggs loves birds. They bring her comfort when she thinks about her dad, a firefighter who was killed in the line of duty. Life without her dad isn’t easy, but at least Birdie still has Mom and Maymee, and her friends Nina and Martin. But then Maymee gets a boyfriend, Nina and Martin start dating, and Birdie’s mom starts seeing a police officer. And suddenly not even her beloved birds can lift Birdie’s spirits. Her world is changing, and Birdie wishes things would go back to how they were before. But maybe change, painful as it is, can be beautiful too.

Roll With It by Jamie Sumner

Ellie’s a girl who tells it like it is. That surprises some people, who see a kid in a wheelchair and think she’s going to be all sunshine and cuddles. The thing is, Ellie has big dreams: She might be eating Stouffer’s for dinner, but one day she’s going to be a professional baker. If she’s not writing fan letters to her favorite celebrity chefs, she’s practicing recipes on her well-meaning, if overworked, mother.

A Monster Like Me by Wendy S Swore

Sophie is a monster expert. Thanks to her Big Book of Monsters and her vivid imagination, Sophie can identify the monsters in her school and neighborhood. Clearly, the bullies are trolls and goblins. Her nice neighbor must be a good witch, and Sophie’s new best friend is obviously a fairy. But what about Sophie? She s convinced she is definitely a monster because of the monster mark on her face. At least that’s what she calls it. The doctors call it a blood tumor.

The Light Jar by Lisa Thompson

Nate and his mother are running away. Fleeing from a bad situation at home, they hide out in an abandoned cottage in the middle of a forest. Though it’s old and run-down, at least it’s a place of their own. Then Nate’s mother heads off for groceries and doesn’t return. Has she run into trouble, or simply abandoned him? He is left alone and afraid, with the dark — and all his old fears — closing in on him.

Stargazing by Jen Wang

Moon is everything Christine isn’t. She’s confident, impulsive, artistic . . . and though they both grew up in the same Chinese-American suburb, Moon is somehow unlike anyone Christine has ever known. But after Moon moves in next door, these unlikely friends are soon best friends, sharing their favorite music videos and painting their toenails when Christine’s strict parents aren’t around. Moon even tells Christine her deepest secret: that she has visions, sometimes, of celestial beings who speak to her from the stars. They reassure her that earth isn’t where she really belongs.

A Green Place to Be: The Creation of Central Park

A Green Place to Be: The Creation of Central Park by Ashley Yazdani

In 1858, New York City was growing so fast that new roads and tall buildings threatened to swallow up the remaining open space. The people needed a green place to be — a park with ponds to row on and paths for wandering through trees and over bridges. When a citywide contest solicited plans for creating a park out of barren swampland, Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted put their heads together to create the winning design, and the hard work of making their plans a reality began

We have been reopened with limited hours since June 15, 2020. With all the pandemic concerns we have had to make changes to the way the library runs day-to-day. If you have been in, I’m sure you have noticed a few of them.

So what has changed?

We applied and received a CARES Act grant for Personal Protective Equipment from the Oklahoma Department of Libraries (OLA) for $1,000. Funding for this grant is thanks to the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). With these funds we are able to install 4 new hand sanitizer stations and purchase additional sanitizing cleaners, to keep the library safer for the community.

We have installed permanent glass shields at both the main circulation and the children’s circulation desks. These shields allow us to help patrons while still maintaining safety protocols. When staff is not behind the shields, we are wearing masks to keep our patrons safer. We frequently wash our hands and we have extra sanitizing protocols in place. We sanitize the high use areas such as computers, copiers, handles, and restrooms more frequently. We have continued to quarantine materials upon their return to the library. We highly encourage all library visitors to wear a mask, sanitize, and wash their hands frequently, as we cannot ensure that every item in the library is cleaned.

Since we are limited to a certain number of people in the building at a time for social distancing standards, we have added additional digital resources for our patrons to access from home. We have started more online programs such as Book Art and added a reading activity tracker called Beanstack to help us create new interactive online programs for patrons of all ages. We also added hoopla to our Electronic Resources.

Hoopla offers eBooks, AudioBooks, digital Graphic Novels, movies, TV shows, and music. If you see a title on hoopla, it is available right away; no waits or holds.

Hoopla borrow periods:

eBooks, audiobooks, and comics –  21 days

Movies and television –  3 days

Music is 7 days for the whole album.

https://miamipl.okpls.org/teens/

We are making improvements to our teen department! We have new furniture on the way and have added a unique photo op area for patrons to take selfies. We are adding board games for teens to use while they hang out in their new space. Thanks to a digital inclusion grant from OLA and IMLS we will be purchasing laptops for in-house use that teens can borrow and use in the Teen Scene while maintaining safe social distance.

Teen Scene Photo Op

Sheldon the Library Turtle

Sheldon is the newest resident of the MPL. He is a red eared slider and he his tank is located near the Genealogy and Children’s Departments. His best friend is Paxton the Library Pack Rat. Sheldon loves when Paxton visits and reads him a story. Sheldon loves all visitors and gets so excited to meet new friends!

The Northstar Digital Literacy Assessment, offered through the Miami Public Library, is aimed at helping adults acquire the skills they need in today’s workplace. 

“People without basic computer know-how are at a disadvantage when it comes to finding a job because employers expect basic computer skills for most jobs, including many entry-level positions,” said Sageser. “We joined Northstar because it will help our clients have a better chance at getting jobs and getting ahead.”

The free set of assessments includes self-guided modules: Essential Computer Skills (Basic Computer Skills, Internet Basics, Using Email, Windows, Mac OS), Essential Software Skills (Word, Excel, PowerPoint), and Using Technology in Daily Life (Social Media, Information Literacy, and Creative Job Search). Closed-captioning is available and screen readers are supported.

Anyone can access the modules and take the tests online at digitalliteracyassessments.org. At the end of each test, the user receives a page of results, which lists the skills that have been mastered and the areas that need improvement. Many community organizations offer computer classes that are aligned with Northstar Digital Literacy Standards. 

“The modules are based on a set of basic computer competency benchmarks developed by a diverse group of literacy providers, business representatives and nonprofit agencies,” said Sageser. “These standards help ensure that computer classes are teaching adult learners the exact skills they need to succeed in the workplace.”

To earn a certificate for one or more of the modules, adults must take the tests in a supervised setting at an approved test site. Miami Public Library is among the community organizations using the standards as part of its programming and offering the certificates. 

Miami Public Library Northstar


To learn more, contact Charla Sageser, Adult Literacy Program Coordinator at the Miami Public Library, 200 N. Main, Miami OK. 918-541-2292 or email csageser@miamiokla.net

Reopening Plan – August 17th, 2020 Update

New rules… If you have questions, just ask.

  • Yes, we are making a few new rules that will be in place until we know more about COVID-19 and its longer-term impact on our community members
  • We also know that not all rules will work for every situation
  • If you have a need that does not fit our rules, please ask us
  • We will try our hardest to accommodate as many requests as possible while keeping our patrons and staff safe
  • The best way to make a request is to contact us before your visit at (918)541-2292
  • Please be aware that these procedures may need to change quickly.  Follow us on Facebook for the latest updates.

Pop-in/Pick-up/Pop-out

  • We will not be enforcing time limits right now, but as we have visitors waiting to enter, we may ask users who have been in the library longer to complete their visit
  • Computer users who are job seeking, completing government or educational paperwork, and finding health or finance information will be given one-hour sessions
  • Seating has been spaced to accommodate social distancing.  Children’s toys and games have been put away.

Hours

  • 9-10 a.m. is reserved for community members 65 and older and those with underlying health conditions (Monday-Saturday)
  • The library is open to the general public 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Wednesday & Thursday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday & Friday; and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday

Safety

  • To protect you, staff will always be masked when outside of their offices or out from behind the circulation desk shield
  • Please protect us and your fellow library users by wearing a mask
  • Separation of six feet from non-household members must be maintained
  • Sanitize your hands upon entry
  • Library staff cannot sanitize every item that is in the library.
    •  It is recommended that Library users wash their hands after handling library materials and avoid touching their face.
  • Increased cleaning by staff is in effect; cleaning frequency will be posted on often used equipment and spaces
  • Families are strongly urged to limit the number of members entering the building
  • If you or anyone in your home is ill, please do not come inside the library
    • You may utilize our curbside service or Online Library.

Books and Materials

  • Curbside pick-up will continue for those who are not yet ready to enter the library
  • Users may browse the shelves with one person/family in an aisle at a time
  • Users will check out at the main circulation desk by sliding their materials under the glass for scanning
  • Interlibrary Loan service will resume

Returning material

  • All materials must be returned in the outdoor book drop
  • Material cannot be accepted inside the library until further notice

Computer Use

  • A limited number of computers will be available for use, one person per computer
  • Sessions may last for up to one hour
  • Printing is available as normal
  • Computers in Children’s Department are not available

Office Services

  • Copying and fax services are available for use by one person at a time

Tables

  • Table use is limited to one person per table and should be used by those with longer research needs

Restrooms and water fountain

  • Restrooms will be open
  • Water fountain will not be accessible

Meeting Rooms

  • Meeting rooms are available by appointment
  • Maximum group size is limited to 10
  • Kitchenette will not be available at this time

Programs and Classes

  • All library provided programs and classes will be provided virtually until further notice.
  • MPL has a large digital collection to choose from!

Beanstack allows you to:

  • Keep track of all family members’ reading logs, progress, and badges on one account.
  • Log reading from home or on the go to earn points.
  • Complete activities at home or in the community to earn more points
  • Read and write book reviews of the books you read.
  • Use the Beanstack Tracker App to keep track of all reading and activities quickly and easily

Getting Started:

  1. Go to the Library’s Beanstack https://miamiokla.beanstack.org/ or download the app from the app store (Apple or Google).
  2. The homepage will show you the available reading programs at the library. Choose the one that is right for you—1000 Books Before Kindergarten, Children’s, Teen, or Adult. *Tip* Multiple readers can be added to the same account, even if they are registered for different programs.
  3. You can also decide to register kids separately if they would like to access themselves.
  4. Account Creator: Select the green “Register” button. Your first name, last name, year age range (necessary due to age restrictions for programs), and a password are required for registration.
  5. Once the Account Creator selects the “Next” button, Beanstack will ask if you would like to register another adult (select ‘yes’ or ‘no’) and then whether you would like to register another child (select ‘yes’ or ‘no’).
  6. A brown band at the bottom of the screen will alert you that you are successfully registered.

Getting to Know the Program:
At the top of the page you will see several links.

  •  – Programs: shows current and upcoming programs available for the Reader (based on age).
  •  – Badges: shows badges when you have completed achievements in a program.
  •  – Reading Log: shows what books (number of books/minutes, title, and author) logged
  •  – Reviews:  shows the reviews that you and other readers from our library have written.
  •  – Points:  see the number of points you have earned and what rewards you have earned.
  •  – Switch Readers/Edit Readers: Allows for easy switching between all Reader’s accounts.
  •  – Personalize: Edit information-, email  notifications, or deactivate a reader’s account.

Logging Books/Minutes/Days/Events:
At the top of each Reader’s account, there is a brown “Log Reading and Activities” button.

1. Click on the button when you are ready to log reading or activities. A window will open to allow you to log.

2. If an account has more than one Reader, the first question will ask which account you wish to log under. Choose the appropriate Reader’s account. Then choose whether you are logging reading or activity.

3. Write the title and author of the book and decide if you want to write a review

4. Click the brown “Log” button and watch for the green band at the bottom of the screen for successful logging. *Make sure you only hit the “Log” button ONCE! The logging window remains open after you log your book. If you are unsure whether it logged successfully, close the window and click on “The Log” button at the top of the screen, under your name.

Book Reviews can be written by anyone with an account. If you wish to write a review, you must do so when you log the book. When you are adding to the log, write the title and author and then click “Write a Review”. Reviews are seen by everyone using Beanstack, but nothing more than your first name and last initial will be seen (*If you wish for your last initial to be removed, your account can be edited to remove your last name).


Rewards

Each challenge has different rewards.

When you have earned a reward, contact the library and schedule a time for pickup! 918-541-2292


Call the library if you have any questions!